Tag Archives: tax increment finance

Redevelopment Redo

17 Sep

The State Legislature recently passed SB 1156, “a bill that would allow cities and counties to create Sustainable Communities Investment Authorities.” The bill now awaits the Governor’s signature at the end of the month. As we’ve noted, SB 1156 attempts to resuscitate elements of redevelopment after all of the state’s redevelopment agencies were shuttered last year. Hopes are high that Governor Brown will sign the new legislation. But is he likely to sign off on this redevelopment redo? Continue reading

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Marching to a Post-Redevelopment Era

16 Jul

The shuttering of the state’s redevelopment agencies continues to unfold with the passage of Assembly Bill 1484 (AB 1484). The bill clarifies some procedural elements of redevelopment (RDA) dissolution, adds new regulations, and all-but-guarantees a showdown between local governments and the state as both grapple to allocate scarce tax resources.

The bill also, surprisingly, hints at one development strategy that the Legislature may adopt as we continue our march to a post-redevelopment era. Continue reading

Simpler, More User Friendly Infrastructure Finance

17 Jun

We all know how important infrastructure investment is to job creation. The concept is straightforward: the more money we invest in infrastructure, the more jobs we create. Though  simple in concept, getting the resources necessary to invest in infrastructure is no easy feat. And with the dissolution of redevelopment agencies across the state, finding gap funding to finance infrastructure has become increasingly difficult.

Unfortunately, limitations on funding for infrastructure have come at a time when infrastructure investments are ideal because interest rates are low, and laborers are many. Given this reality, Californians are looking for new ways to direct resources toward infrastructure development and improvements. Continue reading

Show me the Money

19 Mar
Given our current economic climate, securing funds for long-range transportation projects has been a challenge for cities across the nation. Over the next decade, California’s transportation needs are projected to be funded at less than 50 percent[PDF]. Some governments have addressed the problem by turning to private entities that construct, operate, and maintain their transportation infrastructure. Similarly, the ever popular public-private partnership promises to lessen the burden on local government, but even that funding mechanism falls short. Continue reading